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Political Equator 3

Posted by Keith Pezzoli on June 11, 2011 at 05:22 PM

The Political Equator traces an imaginary line along the US–Mexico border and extends it directly across a world atlas, forming a corridor of global conflict between the 30 and 36 degrees North Parallel. Along this imaginary border encircling the globe lie some of the world’s most contested thresholds. PE3 is a 2-day cross-border mobile conference and community forum held June 3rd and 4th 2011.

Approximately 150 participants in the Political Equator 3 event came together to directly experience places along the U.S.-Mexico border where natural and social dynamics collide. The site visits included: (a) NGO Casa Familiar in the San Ysidro neighborhood on the US side, (b) The Tijuana River Estuary on the US side and (c) NGO Alter Terra in Los Laureles Canyon, an informal settlement in Mexico. Many of the participants crossed the border by foot from the US into Mexico through a culvert beneath the border fence.

Photos of the PE3 event are on The Global ARC Flickr account
http://www.flickr.com/photos/theglobalarc/sets/72157626940615252/

This video clip shows the border crossing in process.

The third program in a series of bi-national conferences, PE3 engaged pressing regional socio-economic, urban and environmental conditions across the San Diego–Tijuana border. These meetings have been focusing on a critical analysis of local conflicts in order to re-evaluate the meaning of shifting global dynamics, across geo-political boundaries, natural resources and marginal communities.

PE III focused on The Border Neighborhood as a Site of Production, investigating practices in the arts, architecture, science and the humanities that work with peripheral neighborhoods worldwide where conditions of social and economic emergency are inspiring new ways of thinking and doing across institutions of urban development and public culture. This event is receiving major support from the FORD Foundation in addition, this project has been supported in part by The Visual Arts Department and Calit2 at University of California, San Diego. for more information go to: PoliticalEquator.org


Also see:
ucsdnews.ucsd.edu/?thisweek/?2011/?06/?06_CruzBorder.asp

facebook.com/?pages/?The-Political-Equator/?128763580533496

youtube.com/?watch?v=cQjT6Rj9PFI

youtube.com/?watch?v=95ZifIvV3rI&feature=related

youtube.com/?watch?v=GNoyMhKb12Q&feature=related

youtube.com/?watch?v=DiW_rSRGQ2w&feature=related

rael-sanfratello.com/??p=1129

mexicoperspective.com/?political-equator-3.html

artandeducation.net/?announcement/?political-equator-3/?

politicalequator.blogspot.com/?

turbulence.org/?blog/?2011/?05/?31/?political-equator-3-san-diego-tijuana/?

ucira.ucsb.edu/ ? ucira-artist-teddy-cruz-presents-political-equator-3-conversations-on-co-existence-border-neighborhoods-as-sites-of-production/ ?

dsgnagnc.org/?2011/?06/?political-equator-3.html

posted in Environmental & Public HealthActivism & Social ChangeSustainability Science & TechnologyUniversities & Engaged ScholarshipUrban Development and Planning • (0) CommentsPermalink

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